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CHAPTER V:
PIOUS FRAUDS

Footnotes

[85:1] "Lucian tells us that whenever any crafty juggler, expert in his trade, and who knew how to make a right use of things, went over to the Christians, he was sure to grow rich immediately, by making a prey of their simplicity. And Celsus represents all the Christian wonder-workers as mere vagabonds and common cheats 'who rambled about to play their tricks at fairs and markets; not in the circles of the wiser and better sort, for among such they never ventured to appear; but whenever they observed a set of raw young follows, slaves or fools; there they took care to intrude themselves and to display their arts.' ... The same charge was constantly urged against them by all the other enemies of the Christian faith, Julian Porphyry etc." Middleton's Free Inquiry, p. 23.

[86:2] McClintock and Strong's Cyclopaedia, "Relics."

[86:3] Ep. 22 ad Marcell.

[86:4] Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[87:5] Gibbon, chap. xxviii., footnote. See also Jortin, vol. iii., p. 90.

[87:6] Gibbon, chap. xxvii.

[88:7] Vol. III., p. 90.

[88:8] Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[88:9] Vol. II, p. 53.

[88:1] Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[89:2] Vol. II., p. 223.

[90:3] Two Essays on Miracles, p. 297.

[90:4] Gibbon, chap, xxiii.; Jortin, vol. ii., p. 29.

[90:5] Histoire Ecclésiastique, Bk. VII, ch. v.

[90:6] Dupin, Bibliothèque Ecclésiastique, vol. iii., p. 149.

[91:7] Calvin, Traité Des Reliques (Geneva, 1599), pp. 19, 20.

[91:8] Gibbon, chap. xxiii.

[91:9] Jortin, Vol. ii, p. 224.

[91:1] Jortin, Vol. iii., pp. 87, 88.

[91:2] Calvin, p. 23.

[92:3] Gibbon, chap. lxi.

[92:4] P. 15.

[92:5] Jortin, vol. ii., p. 45.

[92:6] Calvin, p. 12.

[92:7] Jortin, vol. iii., p. 306.

[92:8] McClintock and Strong's Cyclopedia, "Relics."

[93:9] Dr. Schaff's article on the Worship of Relics: Methodist Quarterly Review, October, 1866.

[93:1] Mosheim, vol. ii, p. 314, footnote.

[93:2] P. 41.

[93:3] Calvin, p. 24.

[93:4] Calvin, p. 37.

[94:5] P. 11

[94:6] H. Foulis, History of Romish Treasons, p. 13.

[94:7] Memoirs Concerning the Portuguese Inquisition, p. 166.

[94:8] Leo Allatius, De Praeputio Domini Nostri Jesu Christi Diatriba.

[95:9] Cornhill Magazine, January, 1869.

[95:1] Eccles. Hist., bk. vii., § 21.

[95:2] Jortin, vol. iii, p. 55.

[96:3] Calvin, p. 49.

[96:4] Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[96:5] Gibbon, chap. xlv.

[96:6] P. 35.

[97:7] Gibbon, chap. xlv., footnote.

[97:8] Calvin, p. 52.

[97:9] Vol. III, p. 5; Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[97:1] Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[98:2] Calvin, P. 61.

[98:3] Bibliothèque Universelle, vi., 14.

[98:4] Jortin, vol. iii., p. 132.

[98:5] Calvin, p. 57.

[98:6] Ep. 53.

[99:7] Jortin, vol. iii., p. 101; Gibbon, chap. xxviii.

[99:8] Calvin, p. 8.

[100:9] Calvin, P. 33.

[100:1] Memoirs of the Portuguese Inquisition, p. 153.

[100:2] Catalogue of the Most Eminently Venerable Relics, etc., 1752.

[101:3] Ibid, p. 17.

[101:4] P. 38.

[101:5] Mosheim says the Christians were so anxious to possess these preservatives of health and safeguards against danger, that those who could not beg, borrow or buy them, deemed it expedient to steal them; for "whatever means were resorted to in such a cause as this were supposed to be pious and acceptable to God, provided they were successful." - Vol. III., p. 223.

[102:8] Jortin, vol. iii., p. 134.

[102:9] Gibbon, chap. xxviii.; Middleton's Free Inquiry, p. 227.

[102:1] Vol. I., p. 421.

[103:2] Rev. J. J. Blunt, Vestiges of Ancient Manners and Customs in Modern Italy, p. 11.

[103:3] Jortin, vol. iii., p. 227.

[103:4] Jortin, vol. iii., p. 228.
 


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